Other Weaving Cords

There are many other cords and patterns used on chair seats, everything from jute and cotton string to nylon washing line! But one of the most familiar and popular is seagrass, this is made from strands of a marsh grass or rush twisted together into a two or three ply rope. It is surprisingly strong and can be woven into many different patterns to give a firm but pliable seat. The only pattern it does not really work well in is the traditional envelope rush pattern, because it is so hard and round it tends to roll and sag with time.

Another popular seating cord is Danish cord. It is a fine, smooth natural paper fibre coil made famous by the sophisticated Scandinavian designers of the mid twentieth century. The most used pattern was a "two by two" basket weave hooked onto nails under the seat rails. The rails are usually quite deep and partially finished. Hans Wegner also designed some chairs with the cord woven in the traditional rush pattern, these chairs have rounded dowel like rails, the side rails being much higher than the front and back.

If you would prefer someone else to do the work for you please visit the Former Glory seat restoration page

Danish cord chair

Danish cord


Danish cord is very hardwearing paper cord that gives a neat comfortable seat. The most common seat weave is the "two by two" pattern. For more details and prices please click on the photo.
Seagrass

Seagrass


Here are two typical seagrass basketwoven seats. Seagrass was used a great deal in school woodworking classes as the chequerboard patterns shown could be taught to children. For more details and prices please click on the photo.
Loom materials

Loom materials


Paper fibre woven fabric and wrapping for "loom" chairs. The most well known of the manufacturers using this type of material is "Lloyd Loom". For more details and prices please click on the photo
Paper loom braid.

Plaited braid


Paper fibre braid, for "loom" chairs. Two widths are available. For more details and prices please click on the photo